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Synopsis

Predatory rats are mickey mouse contrasted and the appalling people in “The Piper,” South Korean helmer-recorder Kim Gwang-tae’s chilling transposition of “The Pied Piper of Hamelin” to a Korean village in the mid ’50s. As a hopeless tale on human instinct (“Crimes perpetrated for survival ought to be pardoned,” notes one character), it’s really old cap, however as a purposeful anecdote on Korean history and governmental issues, the motion picture demonstrates pessimistically attentive, with starkly temperate narrating and sharp visual impacts to boot.

In spite of the dream ghastliness trappings, gorehounds expecting an ordinarily terrible K-thriller result might be disillusioned by the film’s tone of controlled outrage.

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